United Church of Christ What Is the UCC?
I am the UCC . . .

My roots go back 2,000 years, but I am very much now and today.

I am not strict with tradition or dripping in rituals.

Instead, I embrace modern, intelligent thinking:

Acceptance

Inclusiveness

Justice 


I can even be light hearted. My open-armed approach is appealing to people of all races and lifestyles. Which might explain why my congregations are diverse and unique. 

Another funny thing happens when you’re less judgmental – you allow people to search, discover, and flourish. My friends come to me to seek their own answers, look inside themselves and explore their spiritual lives. 

 In the end, my personality is reflective of Christ’s.

Open            Embracing           Nurturing         And eternally relevant

United Church of Christ


United Church of Christ Daily Devotional Page


Penn Northeast Conference of the UCC
Our Conference

 UCC Theology page 
A look at the theology of the UCC

​What Is the United Church of Christ (UCC)?
 
The United Church of Christ came into being in 1957, although its roots branch as far back as the Pilgrims of Plymouth Plantation (1620) and the Puritans of the Massachusetts Bay Colony (1629).
 
Four earlier denominations and people from diverse backgrounds contributed to our formation: the Christian Church, the Reformed Church, the Congregational Church, and the Evangelical Church. Through the years, members of many other groups and nationalities joined the original four, and the U.C.C. celebrates and continues a wide variety of traditions in its common life.
 
"The United Church of Christ acknowledges as its sole head, Jesus Christ, Son of God and Savior. It acknowledges as kindred in Christ all who share in this confession. It looks to the Word of God in the Scripture, and to the presence and power of the Holy spirit, to prosper its creative and redemptive work in the world. It claims as its own the faith of the historic Church expressed in the ancient creeds and reclaimed in the basic insights of the Protestant Reformers. It affirms the responsibility of the Church in each generation to make this faith its own in reality of worship, in honesty of thought and expression, and in purity of heart before God, in accordance with the teaching of our Lord and the practice prevailing among evangelical Christians, it recognizes two sacraments; Baptism and the Lord's Supper or Holy Communion."
 
from the Preamble to the Constitution of the United Church of Christ 

 

What does the logo symbolize? 

The symbol of the United Church of Christ comprises a crown, cross and orb enclosed within a double oval bearing the name of the church and the prayer of Jesus, "That they may all be one" (John 17:21). It is based on an ancient Christian symbol called the "Cross of Victory" or the "Cross Triumphant." The crown symbolizes the sovereignty of Christ. The cross recalls the suffering of Christ—his arms outstretched on the wood of the cross—for the salvation of humanity. The orb, divided into three parts, reminds us of Jesus' command to be his "witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria and to the ends of the earth" (Acts 1:8). The verse from Scripture reflects our historic commitment to the restoration of unity among the separated churches of Jesus Christ.

The UCC is a church of many firsts. You could say that we are the original “Act Up “ people. You will see from most of these stories that it’s not always easy being first and not as pretty as we would often make it out to be. Please use the following link to find out more:  

www.ucc.org/about-us/short-course/